The Zone: ZPD!

Hi everyone,

I have uploaded a short video about Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development. It took me a long time to put together but I am proud to say that I recorded it in it’s entirety in the first try! I used Camtasia and it worked perfectly.

Enjoy!

~Carolina

14 Comments

  1. Carolina, I thought you did very well with this video. You kept it within the time limit and was able to explain the topic clearly. There were three things that I really enjoyed about your video. First, I liked how you outlined at the beginning what the listener should learn. It made it easy to follow along in the presentation and it made me aware if I had missed a piece of information that I needed to know. Second, I like how you provided two or three visuals or examples to explain the concept. This insures that most likely there is one example that each listener can relate to and use to understand ZPD. You also did well in explaining the transfer into the learning classroom. I found it interesting in this section that you included more topics like learning knowledge through a series of steps without really going into more details about it. This made me want to research more about the topic because it was clear that there was more to learn about it than you had discussed in the video.

    If I had to find something to critique it would be the basketball example. I personally had been viewing the ZPD as a cognitive tool/task in regards to learning/mastering skills. Then the basketball example is more of a physical learning /development skill. It took me a little while to transfer and grasp how the example was demonstrating ZPD. In the end, as I mentioned above, I figured it out but it did cause some confusion for a brief period of time. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. Hi, Carolina,

    The clarity of your video presentation is refreshing to a non-psychologist reader. The complexities of the topic are broken down into a series of manageable steps that are relevant to every learner.

    The theory leads me to understand that social interaction is valued more than the individual within the process of learning. I would be interested to know what value Vygotsky places on individual creative thinking, critical thinking, personal development and decision making within the auspices of the theory.

    Best regards,

    Ton

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  3. Hi Carolina,

    Your video was absolutely outstanding. You took dense material and explained it in a direct, concise, and easy to comprehend way. Your drawings were helpful at the beginning to explain ZPD and your subsequent example with the father and son playing basketball helped further cement the new concept in my mind. Following that example with a practical application for the classroom was stellar, and it helped having a recap. Like Charlie, I find myself struggling with anything to critique on your video. If anything, there was an abbreviated term you mentioned in addition to ZPD that I didn’t remember as easily. Great job!

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  4. Bravo, Carolina! As usual, great job!

    Here are my thoughts:

    What I really liked: at the 3:16 marked, you told your audience (us) why this is important. Additionally, you provided ways in which we can apply ZPD in the classroom. So often we can lost in the “science” and forgot to focus on why this matters.

    Tip for the Future: I feel like a broken records, but like my peers, I had trouble finding any criticism. If anything, I did have to rewatch the basketball example. Great example, but perhaps a “recap” would have made it easier to see how it applied to ZPD.

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  5. Carolina,

    I’d never heard of the Zone of Proximal Development before watching your video, so the experience was very illuminating. The basketball metaphor was a useful illustration that handled the concepts you were explaining both succinctly and accessibly. I thought of a parent teaching a child to ride a bicycle by holding the bike up before that scene started, so it’s good to know we were on the same page, haha.

    I also appreciated you taking the time to give examples of how scaffolding can be implemented as a pedagogical strategy. It’s a word that gets bandied about a lot, and this was one of the more to-the-point approaches to scaffolding that I’d seen/heard, which was refreshing.

    The only thing I might add to this video is a note on how to group students with peers who are MKOs without making any student feel *less* knowledgeable than another, as this could be to the detriment of that student’s motivation and/or self-esteem. That said, I found your video both informative and entertaining.

    Thanks!

    Kit

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  6. Hi Carolina,

    Great job on your video. I really appreciated how you did not speak too quickly. That happens all too often in videos.

    Also, you were very clear and concise when explaining your concept. I feel very confident that I understand ZPD.

    I wonder, though, does ZPD apply more to tangible subjects such as sciences and maths then it might to more abstract subjects like literature and history? Just a thought.

    Thanks,
    Marieke

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  7. Carolina, this is amazing!

    I’m not familiar with ZPD, but it looks like it should be applicable to many fields. The MKO assists the learner in building a skill or understanding a concept step-by-step. Once the learner understands/masters a skill, they can move onto the next and build on the first. Currently I’m taking the intro class for Statistics and this is completely applicable. Once we master one formula or skill, it is used in the next concept and we should (theoretically) understand the next skill better.

    This also seems applicable to courses that have student-led sessions. When students become the teacher, they learn the material so that they can teach it to their peers. I wonder, though, how it would work in group work and if the MKO may steamroll the other students?

    Thanks!
    Erin

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  8. Really nice job, Carolina! I appreciate the roadmap you gave for learners at the beginning. It helped outline the key things that I felt I should remember about ZPD.

    I like your use of graphics and drawings. The graphics, ultimately, helped me to understand ZPD. Your pace was nice, too, as I was able to keep up and process what you were saying. The use of graphics and the pacing provides a nice balance for visual and audio learners.

    I appreciate how you ended the lecture with practical recommendations for instructors – #everystudentcanlearn. I will be mindful of your lecture and what you described when I’m teaching. This video is a good resource to have when I may need a refresher on ZPD in the future.

    Overall, superb job. Thank you for a great example of the assignment. I’m curious- what made you choose ZPD? Does ZPD relate to your research interests? Was it a topic just interesting to you? Really cool concept! This (I believe) was my first time learning about it.

    Kiara

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  9. Hi Carolina,

    Your learning module video on the zone of proximal development fully covered all of the aspects of this concept as well as the associated concept of scaffolding. Moreover, I found that the concepts were easy to follow and were explained in terms that could be understandable to others outside of academia. The one thing that could have been explored a little bit more was identifying and assessing students zone of proximal development. It would have been very helpful to have some particular strategies that are specifically tailored to identify this zone in students as differentiation was explained more through the strategies than the assessment component of student’s zone of proximal development.

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  10. So… anyone that knows me should be aware that I love quotes… even better when you effectively utilize a quote by the theorist that developed your subject matter… WOW! Kudos to you and Vygotsky; you for your video, absolutely primo and him for this theory and quote. Your visuals were spot on in guiding through the subject for understanding, your basketball analogy was simple (you admitted it yourself) and effective in referring to ZPD and MKO as a step-by-step process… I even appreciate “instruction+scaffolding+interaction=learning”… I can repeat it without effort, thank you… this was value added for me.
    It’s difficult for me to make a suggestion here… ummmm… hmmmm… ummmm… maybe some pretty pictures… lol… in all seriousness, possibly, maybe give us a deeper thinking (yes, my subject) analogy.

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  11. Carolina,

    I really like the way you set up the video and told the viewer what to expect. Your graphics are really effective as well. Your “silly” example of a father teaching a son to dunk a basketball was a great way to break down ZPD. I was glad to see that you made a video on ZPD since I touched on it only slightly in mine, and it’s such an important concept in teaching. I’m impressed that this was done in one take. That’s no easy task. Well done.

    -Dana

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  12. Your video was very well organized and the information was easy to digest. The historical background in the beginning about Lev Vygotsky was condensed very well and is a great example of how text should not overwhelm presentations. Although I have heard the term, I did not have any knowledge on The Zone of Proximal Development so this video was very informative. It would be very interesting to see what students feel they can do alone and what they feel they need help with. I am not sure if teachers or students think of that gap as much as they should. Your graphics were amazing and truly enhanced the presentation. I felt like I was actually sitting in a presentation. The scaffolding was particularly interesting, I would have liked to hear about little more about that concept. I love a good quote and your ending helped compliment your presentation. I do not have any critiques, it was such a complex topic I am not sure if this could have been done any better.

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  13. Hi Caroline,

    Great job presenting Zone of Proximal distance. This is not term that I was familiar with prior to viewing your video. However, I feel as though I have a working knowledge of the concept. I might have missed this in the video, but I am assuming that this zone becomes smaller as an individual masters a particular task or topic. Is this assumption correct? Overall, great video. I do not have any suggestions other than I would definitely like to learn more about this concept. Thanks for sharing.

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